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Families in the Mid-Ohio Valley supported over 200 competitors in Esali Birth's 10th annual Mother's Day 5k and many more in the River City Kids race that followed.

Proceeds from the 5k help to support Esali Birth's mission in the Mid-Ohio Valley through workshops and outreach.  The 2017 esali5k helped to fund the Esali Birth Pregnancy Bags for expecting mothers in the MOV.  We are looking forward to seeing where the 2018 race will allow us to help the most.

We are so thankful for the participants, volunteers, and sponsors that make this happen - we absolutely could not do this without the people behind the event!

It is always a joy to see so many families, babies in strollers and carriers, children running and walking alongside their families, and their support team cheering them on and helping raise awareness for Happy Healthy Birth and Breastfeeding throughout the Mid-Ohio Valley.

What do we know about Happy Healthy Birth in the MOV?

  • Until 2017, West Virginia had ZERO Baby-Friendly hospitals.  O'bleness is the closest Baby-Friendly hospital to the Mid-Ohio Valley.  The Baby-Friendly designation means a hospital has followed steps to support things like skin-to-skin care immediately after birth and other factors like qualified breastfeeding support to help with breastfeeding outcomes.  Did you know?  Parent companies of formula companies are the ones that make hospital machinery like X-Ray and MRI machines.  When hospitals give out free formula from those child companies, they will receive kickbacks for other areas of the hospital.  Some hospitals refuse to give up this part of the Baby-Friendly requirements to avoid losing those kick-backs.  The Mid-Ohio Valley doesn't have any Baby-Friendly Certified hospitals.
  • As of 2013, CCMH had a 40% cesarean rate. ALMOST HALF of women stepping into this hospital for childbirth are having surgical births; most, of which, could be prevented.  Half of these were primary cesareans and half were repeat cesareans.  In the past ten years, this rate has increased significantly.  Did you know the World Health Organization considers a cesarean rate between 10-15% ideal and states, "Two new HRP studies show that when caesarean section rates rise towards 10% across a population, the number of maternal and newborn deaths decreases. When the rate goes above 10%, there is no evidence that mortality rates improve."
  • Marietta Memorial Hospital has an official VBAC ban - Vaginal Birth After Cesarean is refused.  This not only means they will refuse to grant the request of a mother to labor without resistance if she has had a previous cesarean, but also that they will exhaust all means of a mother laboring that has never had a cesarean (but that may need a cesarean) to prove beyond a shadow of a doubt that a cesarean was the last resort to support their VBAC ban.  Sounds ideal at first, except when interventions and risks are unnecessarily increased in the process.
  • Some birth locations are changing their policies to support parent's wishes as well as improve skin-to-skin time after birth and connection during the first few days postpartum.  Some are not.  The most important thing to remember is that knowledge is power.  By learning about ALL your options and getting connected with your holistic resources throughout the Mid-Ohio Valley, you can make better informed decisions for a more well-rounded confident birth.
  • Home birth (including VBAC (or HBAC), twin birth, and breech birth) is a well supported option in and surrounding the Mid-Ohio Valley.  You can find some providers that offer these services by checking out the MOV Birth Workers page.
  • The MOV Breastfeeding, Birth, and Parenting Social is similar to La Leche League - though in addition to breastfeeding education and support for moms and their support system, we also enjoy birth and early parenting education and support.  Come say hello from pregnancy through early parenting on the 4th Saturday of every month (except December).
  • Doula care prenatally, during labor, and postpartum is known world-wide to support mother's experiences including supporting spontaneous labor, biological breastfeeding, and postpartum healing, but also providing families with the confidence and knowledge to make informed decisions no matter where they birth or what decisions need to be made through the perinatal period.  The Mid-Ohio Valley is now thriving with doulas and perinatal mentors.  All a family has to do is a simple internet search and holistic care is at your fingertips, including through #MOVdoula right here on Esali Birth.  Learn more about what a doula does from pregnancy (or pre-conception) through postpartum including supporting unassisted births, supported at home births, birth centers, hospitals, medicated births, 42+ week births, home birth transfers, preterm births, breech birth, twin birth, cesarean birth, assisted birth, birth plans, no birth plans, change your birth plans, and #ALLthebirths in between.  A doula supports YOU.

Want to know more of the ins and outs of Happy Healthy Birth in the Mid-Ohio Valley?  Schedule some mentoring, take a birth class, find a doula, and let's chat about all the holistic support options you have available to you right here in the MOV.

Read the Parkersburg News and Sentinnel write-up.

2018 MD5k Results

Overall

Place Bib Name Time M/F Age Group Run/Walk
1 187 Harrison Potter  0:18'50.33 Male 30-34 Run
2 214 Nathan Cunningham  0:19'10.49 Male 25-29 Run
3 161 Joe Wiltsey  0:20'32.02 Male 45-49 Run
4 119 Robert Boston  0:21'12.52 Male 50-54 Run
5 193 Johnathan Haddox  0:21'24.49 Male 20-24 Run
6 159 Teddy Menisher  0:21'50.11 Male 45-49 Run
7 190 Yvonne Gilders  0:21'55.55 Female 35-39 Run
8 212 Steve Osborne  0:22'23.70 Male 40-44 Run
9 120 Andrew Essig  0:22'39.74 Male 20-24 Run
10 200 Quentin Corbitt  0:23'22.83 Male 20-24 Run
11 211 Steve Beck  0:23'29.33 Male 30-34 Run
12 178 Kaylor Offenberger  0:23'30.45 Female 13-19 Run
13 138 Nathan Jones  0:23'58.05 Male 30-34 Run
14 219 Nathan Plotner  0:23'59.24 Male 12 & Under Run
15 109 Dominick Walleshauser  0:24'15.55 Male 13-19 Run
16 218 Ashley Becker  0:24'16.36 Female 30-34 Run
17 162 Patrick Cathey  0:24'20.02 Male 65-69 Run
18 155 Johm Toomey  0:24'47.58 Male 30-34 Run
19 168 Erin Stanley  0:24'53.27 Female 35-39 Run
20 202 Ryan Martin  0:25'25.39 Male 12 & Under Run
21 207 Chris Hackney  0:25'36.08 Male 35-39 Run
22 147 Brian Seeley  0:25'45.92 Male 50-54 Run
23 112 Anna Vanderlaan  0:25'56.49 Female 50-54 Run
24 180 Taylor Bowers  0:25'58.24 Male 13-19 Run
25 149 Lindsay Hill  0:26'00.17 Female 25-29 Run
26 191 Katie Vickers  0:26'08.30 Female 30-34 Run
27 173 Desirae Caplinger  0:26'10.30 Female 12 & Under Run
28 217 Candy Bailey  0:26'34.92 Female 40-44 Run
29 182 Kenneth Angle  0:26'53.86 Male 50-54 Run
30 194 Virginia Haddox  0:27'03.74 Female 12 & Under Run
31 123 Sullivan Wilson  0:27'21.64 Male 13-19 Run
32 183 Kayla Suoler  0:27'41.36 Female 20-24 Run
33 192 Robert Sheridan  0:28'25.61 Male 55-59 Run
34 157 Jaime Ford  0:28'36.92 Female 40-44 Run
35 156 Aaron Ford  0:28'37.33 Male 40-44 Run
36 134 Joe Mills  0:28'39.27 Male 40-44 Run
37 206 Gatlin McLain  0:28'42.61 Male 12 & Under Run
38 204 Drew McLain  0:28'42.83 Male 35-39 Run
39 201 Mike Brown  0:28'46.77 Male 45-49 Run
40 139 Haley Church  0:28'56.30 Female 13-19 Run
41 189 Josh Windland  0:29'38.92 Male 20-24 Run
42 143 Donald Lane  0:30'52.95 Male 60-64 Run
43 125 Stacy Wilson  0:31'21.58 Female 35-39 Run
44 114 Rod Cummings  0:31'29.80 Male 45-49 Run
45 148 Amanda Richards  0:31'30.14 Female 25-29 Run
46 169 Emma Stanley  0:32'05.49 Female 12 & Under Run
47 170 Becky Poling  0:32'13.52 Female 50-54 Run
48 151 Ethan Lamb  0:32'17.77 Male 25-29 Run
49 127 Rob Law  0:32'31.58 Male 40-44 Run
50 380 Jason Mader  0:32'35.17 Male 45-49 Walk
51 146 Savannah Jarvis  0:33'00.14 Female 13-19 Run
52 133 Johathan McCarthy  0:33'05.02 Male 25-29 Run
53 165 Kevin Allen  0:33'10.55 Male 45-49 Run
54 144 Diana Cline  0:33'23.70 Female 55-59 Run
55 228 Erica Ash  0:33'34.05 Female 30-34 Run
56 312 Sharon Marks  0:33'48.99 Female 60-64 Walk
57 223 Joshua Eddy  0:33'50.11 Male 12 & Under Run
58 221 Jillian Eddy  0:33'50.83 Female 35-39 Run
59 210 Jackson Fallon  0:34'02.70 Male 12 & Under Run
60 209 Seth Fallon  0:34'03.14 Male 30-34 Run
61 140 Ivy Linger  0:34'45.61 Female 13-19 Run
62 181 Mindy Bowers  0:35'07.05 Female 30-34 Run
63 105 Erick Braniff  0:35'11.89 Male 30-34 Run
64 142 Pamela Addis  0:35'19.05 Female 55-59 Run
65 129 Megan Law  0:35'32.49 Female 20-24 Run
66 117 Bernard Bookman  0:35'39.39 Male 50-54 Run
67 128 Linda Law  0:35'45.77 Female 40-44 Run
68 196 Waylen Jarvis  0:35'55.95 Male 12 & Under Run
69 227 Kim Williams  0:35'59.70 Female 35-39 Run
70 126 Wendy Mick  0:36'00.52 Male 30-34 Run
71 226 Braden Williams  0:36'06.92 Male 12 & Under Run
72 195 Shawnna Jarvis  0:36'08.99 Female 35-39 Run
73 308 Brenis Phillips  0:36'35.30 Male 60-64 Walk
74 371 Ray Poling  0:36'36.36 Male 60-64 Walk
75 171 Christian Clatterbuck  0:36'54.99 Male 13-19 Run
76 160 Charlie Pickens  0:37'04.74 Male 70 & Over Run
77 152 Jackson Carroll  0:37'10.89 Male 12 & Under Run
78 172 Elsie Horton  0:37'14.02 Female 40-44 Run
79 374 Karen Meeks  0:37'17.67 Female 60-64 Walk
80 135 Summer Mills  0:37'19.45 Female 40-44 Run
81 222 Jalyn Eddy  0:37'36.80 Female 12 & Under Run
82 145 Lynn Stroble  0:37'38.74 Female 40-44 Run
83 185 Michelle Gibson  0:37'45.70 Female 25-29 Run
84 158 Megan Mahoney  0:37'50.30 Female 30-34 Run
85 188 Jennifer Lackey  0:37'54.45 Female 30-34 Run
86 213 Jack Lane  0:38'00.42 Male 65-69 Run
87 354 Vicki Williams  0:38'13.52 Female 50-54 Walk
88 208 Mary Beth Bauman  0:38'32.08 Female 55-59 Run
89 370 William Cunningham  0:38'34.42 Male 70 & Over Walk
90 113 Lyra Su  0:38'51.11 Female 25-29 Run
91 376 George Welch  0:38'57.36 Male 60-64 Walk
92 381 Linda Arnold  0:39'04.55 Female 60-64 Walk
93 378 Kim Windland  0:39'12.21 Female 55-59 Walk
94 167 Tabitha Tanner  0:39'30.11 Female 30-34 Run
95 224 Misty Sims  0:39'32.39 Female 40-44 Run
96 361 Barbara Jahn  0:40'03.52 Female 70 & Over Walk
97 110 Peggy Grimm  0:40'10.05 Female 70 & Over Run
98 320 Michelle Buckner  0:40'16.08 Female 40-44 Walk
99 186 Larry Atkinson  0:40'33.89 Male 55-59 Run
100 150 Melanie Lamb  0:40'34.08 Female 25-29 Run
101 301 Bob Heddleston  0:40'56.92 Male 55-59 Walk
102 225 April Terrell  0:41'07.08 Female 40-44 Run
103 303 Joan Smith  0:41'13.17 Female 65-69 Walk
104 315 Nancy Goff  0:41'16.77 Female 40-44 Walk
105 362 Martha Marks  0:41'23.80 Female 65-69 Walk
106 372 Erica Baker  0:41'29.02 Female 45-49 Walk
107 353 Joseph Morris  0:41'58.02 Male 35-39 Walk
108 230 Kris Casto  0:42'30.55 Female 50-54 Run
109 137 Lane Wasson  0:43'00.49 Male 12 & Under Run
110 136 Denise Wasson  0:43'00.83 Female 40-44 Run
111 199 Ty Starkey  0:43'21.58 Female 30-34 Run
112 383 Ernie Doll  0:43'25.70 Male 70 & Over Walk
113 111 Brianna Cross  0:44'06.67 Female 35-39 Run
114 363 Cherrie Cowan  0:44'34.92 Female 60-64 Run
115 313 Deb Patrick  0:44'45.89 Female 60-64 Walk
116 153 Vanessa McCrady  0:44'49.08 Female 30-34 Run
117 342 Kim Holdren  0:44'56.99 Female 60-64 Walk
118 229 Jace Riffle  0:45'00.83 Male 12 & Under Run
119 216 Jessica Riffle  0:45'01.17 Female 30-34 Run
120 215 Becky Offenberger  0:45'02.11 Female 55-59 Run
121 220 Pat Letson  0:45'36.58 Male 50-54 Run
122 205 Courtney McLain  0:45'38.80 Female 35-39 Run
123 339 Kathleen Ervine  0:45'44.36 Female 60-64 Walk
124 384 Tonya Venham  0:45'45.89 Female 40-44 Walk
125 203 Slaten McLain  0:45'46.39 Male 12 & Under Run
126 154 Bill Toomey  0:46'08.21 Male 65-69 Run
127 141 Jeanette Linger  0:46'13.64 Female 45-49 Run
128 375 Tiffany Jones  0:46'33.36 Female 35-39 Walk
129 382 Jim Arnold  0:46'35.45 Male 60-64 Walk
130 330 Megan Proctor  0:46'42.58 Female 20-24 Walk
131 329 Jennifer Yerex  0:46'43.33 Female 50-54 Walk
132 328 Renee Ellenwood  0:46'47.05 Female 55-59 Walk
133 340 Renae Duncan  0:46'55.61 Female 40-44 Walk
134 341 Shelby Enoch  0:46'55.86 Female 25-29 Walk
135 175 Angie Board  0:46'58.83 Female 45-49 Run
136 233 Harley Woodward  0:47'26.27 Male 12 & Under Run
137 302 Kim Bradley  0:47'29.55 Female 55-59 Walk
138 314 Misty Mason  0:47'30.21 Female 30-34 Walk
139 346 Mike Chevalier  0:47'30.83 Male 55-59 Walk
140 116 Gabriel Bookman  0:47'32.21 Male 13-19 Run
141 107 Daniel Braniff  0:47'32.77 Male 12 & Under Run
142 176 Chase Board  0:47'33.11 Male 12 & Under Run
143 106 Carmen Ezell  0:47'33.64 Female 12 & Under Run
144 104 Eva Braniff  0:47'34.02 Female 30-34 Run
145 311 Brian DeLong  0:48'38.83 Male 35-39 Walk
146 338 Lisa Null  0:48'57.67 Female 50-54 Walk
147 337 Maggie Starkey  0:48'58.86 Female 25-29 Walk
148 377 Scott Simonton  0:49'12.24 Male 50-54 Walk
149 322 Mandy Amos  0:49'20.11 Female 35-39 Walk
150 327 Tammy Theobald  0:49'21.08 Female 55-59 Walk
151 385 Angela Plotner  0:49'40.92 Female 40-44 Walk
152 319 Connie Porter  0:49'43.70 Female 70 & Over Walk
153 386 Todd Plotner  0:49'52.45 Male 45-49 Walk
154 359 Kari Brown  0:50'31.11 Female 30-34 Walk
155 177 Tommy Nichols  0:50'45.30 Male 70 & Over Run
156 321 Joyce Cunningham  0:51'13.67 Female 60-64 Walk
157 166 Nancy Carpenter  0:51'24.92 Female 55-59 Run
158 118 Connie Bookman  0:51'35.36 Female 50-54 Run
159 174 Karen A. Caplinger  0:51'43.08 Female 45-49 Run
160 184 Shyanne Fury  0:51'43.67 Female 13-19 Run
161 325 Sandy Colvin  0:52'02.64 Female 60-64 Walk
162 326 Patty Metz  0:52'03.05 Female 50-54 Walk
163 163 Cindy Daniel  0:52'56.39 Female 55-59 Run
164 101 Nicole Gaines  0:52'58.74 Female 30-34 Run
165 323 Daryl Jones  0:53'16.70 Male 30-34 Walk
166 324 Elisabeth Jones  0:53'17.49 Female 30-34 Walk
167 355 Angela Johnson  0:54'17.05 Female 30-34 Walk
168 197 Caleb Sutt  0:54'37.11 Male 13-19 Run
169 179 Baili Matheny  0:54'37.36 Male 13-19 Run
170 198 Kadon Messanger  0:54'37.61 Male 13-19 Run
171 309 Candy Jones  0:54'47.67 Female 60-64 Walk
172 108 Peggy Murphy  0:55'01.86 Female 40-44 Run
173 388 Crystal Woodward  0:55'06.30 Female 13-19 Walk
174 365 Kahle Mahoney  0:55'11.83 Male 30-34 Walk
175 231 Zoey Morris  0:55'56.92 Female 12 & Under Run
176 232 Leah McFann  0:55'57.77 Female 12 & Under Run
177 373 Lisa Hinsly  0:56'02.80 Female 35-39 Walk
178 103 Kaitlyn Thom  0:56'21.61 Female 25-29 Run
179 318 Adryanne Garrett  0:56'26.49 Female 30-34 Walk
180 379 Emily Teuanger  0:56'28.24 Female 25-29 Walk
181 316 Melissa Barth  0:57'36.70 Female 45-49 Walk
182 317 Kelie Barth  0:57'37.02 Female 20-24 Walk
183 306 Tonya Newell  0:57'41.33 Female 40-44 Walk
184 307 Tina Brucker  0:57'41.80 Female 45-49 Walk
185 358 Kathleen Lanham  0:57'52.80 Female 55-59 Walk
186 387 Zach Lanham  0:57'53.17 Male 25-29 Walk
187 115 Owen Bookman  0:58'07.24 Male 12 & Under Run
188 350 Brianne Moore  0:58'12.05 Female 35-39 Walk
189 335 Brooke Wasson  0:58'39.61 Female 12 & Under Walk
190 336 Sandy McCroskey  0:58'40.74 Female 70 & Over Walk
191 334 Jeff Wasson  0:58'41.92 Male 50-54 Walk
192 344 Penny Morris  0:58'43.27 Female 60-64 Walk
193 345 Milt Morris  0:58'44.36 Male 65-69 Walk
194 368 Johni Wigal  0:59'04.67 Female 55-59 Walk
195 367 Leah LaPrade  0:59'05.11 Female 25-29 Walk
196 348 Alexis Gilbert  0:59'07.77 Female 20-24 Walk
197 349 Nicole Venuso  0:59'08.99 Female 20-24 Walk
198 347 Angela Fluharty  0:59'09.89 Female 45-49 Walk
199 305 Laura Wolfe  1:02'45.92 Female 30-34 Walk
200 304 Jeffrey Wolfe  1:02'51.99 Male 35-39 Walk
201 364 Rina Goins  1:03'38.89 Female 50-54 Walk
202 360 Sue Mahoney  1:05'24.83 Female 50-54 Walk
203 366 Scott Mahoney  1:05'29.70 Male 55-59 Walk

Awards

Male Overall Runner
Place Bib Name Time
1 187 Harrison Potter  0:18'50.33
2 214 Nathan Cunningham  0:19'10.49
3 161 Joe Wiltsey  0:20'32.02
Female Overall Runner
Place Bib Name
7 190 Yvonne Gilders  0:21'55.55
12 178 Kaylor Offenberger  0:23'30.45
16 218 Ashley Becker  0:24'16.36
Male Overall Walker
Place Bib Name Time
50 380 Jason Mader  0:32'35.17
73 308 Brenis Phillips  0:36'35.30
74 371 Ray Poling  0:36'36.36
Female Overall Walker
Place Bib Name Time
56 312 Sharon Marks  0:33'48.99
79 374 Karen Meeks  0:37'17.67
87 354 Vicki Williams  0:38'13.52
Male 12 & Under Runner
Place Bib Name Time
14 219 Nathan Plotner  0:23'59.24
20 202 Ryan Martin  0:25'25.39
37 206 Gatlin McLain  0:28'42.61
Female 12 & Under Runner
Place Bib Name Time
27 173 Desirae Caplinger  0:26'10.30
30 194 Virginia Haddox  0:27'03.74
46 169 Emma Stanley  0:32'05.49
Female 12 & Under Walker
Place Bib Name Time
189 335 Brooke Wasson  0:58'39.61
Male 13-19 Runner
Place Bib Name Time
15 109 Dominick Walleshauser  0:24'15.55
24 180 Taylor Bowers  0:25'58.24
31 123 Sullivan Wilson  0:27'21.64
Female 13-19 Runner
Place Bib Name Time
40 139 Haley Church  0:28'56.30
51 146 Savannah Jarvis  0:33'00.14
61 140 Ivy Linger  0:34'45.61
Female 13-19 Walker
Place Bib Name Time
173 388 Crystal Woodward  0:55'06.30
Male 20-24 Runner
Place Bib Name Time
5 193 Johnathan Haddox  0:21'24.49
9 120 Andrew Essig  0:22'39.74
10 200 Quentin Corbitt  0:23'22.83
Female 20-24 Runner
Place Bib Name Time
32 183 Kayla Suoler  0:27'41.36
65 129 Megan Law  0:35'32.49
Female 20-24 Walker
Place Bib Name Time
130 330 Megan Proctor  0:46'42.58
182 317 Kelie Barth  0:57'37.02
196 348 Alexis Gilbert  0:59'07.77
Male 25-29 Runner
Place Bib Name Time
48 151 Ethan Lamb  0:32'17.77
52 133 Johathan McCarthy  0:33'05.02
Female 25-29 Runner
Place Bib Name Time
25 149 Lindsay Hill  0:26'00.17
45 148 Amanda Richards  0:31'30.14
83 185 Michelle Gibson  0:37'45.70
Male 25-29 Walker
Place Bib Name Time
186 387 Zach Lanham  0:57'53.17
Female 25-29 Walker
Place Bib Name Time
134 341 Shelby Enoch  0:46'55.86
147 337 Maggie Starkey  0:48'58.86
180 379 Emily Teuanger  0:56'28.24
Male 30-34 Runner
Place Bib Name Time
11 211 Steve Beck  0:23'29.33
13 138 Nathan Jones  0:23'58.05
18 155 Johm Toomey  0:24'47.58
Female 30-34 Runner
Place Bib Name Time
26 191 Katie Vickers  0:26'08.30
55 228 Erica Ash  0:33'34.05
26 191 Katie Vickers  0:26'08.30
Male 30-34 Walk
Place Bib Name Time
165 323 Daryl Jones  0:53'16.70
174 365 Kahle Mahoney  0:55'11.83
Female 30-34 Walk
Place Bib Name Time
138 314 Misty Mason  0:47'30.21
154 359 Kari Brown  0:50'31.11
166 324 Elisabeth Jones  0:53'17.49
Male 35-39 Runner
Place Bib Name Time
21 207 Chris Hackney  0:25'36.08
38 204 Drew McLain  0:28'42.83
Female 35-39 Runner
Place Bib Name Time
19 168 Erin Stanley  0:24'53.27
43 125 Stacy Wilson  0:31'21.58
58 221 Jillian Eddy  0:33'50.83
Male 35-39 Walk
Place Bib Name Time
107 353 Joseph Morris  0:41'58.02
145 311 Brian DeLong  0:48'38.83
200 304 Jeffrey Wolfe  1:02'51.99
Female 35-39 Walk
Place Bib Name Time
128 375 Tiffany Jones  0:46'33.36
149 322 Mandy Amos  0:49'20.11
177 373 Lisa Hinsly  0:56'02.80
Male 40-44 Runner
Place Bib Name Time
8 212 Steve Osborne  0:22'23.70
35 156 Aaron Ford  0:28'37.33
36 134 Joe Mills  0:28'39.27
Female 40-44 Runner
Place Bib Name Time
28 217 Candy Bailey  0:26'34.92
34 157 Jaime Ford  0:28'36.92
67 128 Linda Law  0:35'45.77
Female 40-44 Walk
Place Bib Name Time
98 320 Michelle Buckner  0:40'16.08
104 315 Nancy Goff  0:41'16.77
124 384 Tonya Venham  0:45'45.89
Male 45-49 Runner
Place Bib Name Time
6 159 Teddy Menisher  0:21'50.11
39 201 Mike Brown  0:28'46.77
44 114 Rod Cummings  0:31'29.80
Female 45-49 Runner
Place Bib Name Time
127 141 Jeanette Linger  0:46'13.64
135 175 Angie Board  0:46'58.83
159 174 Karen A. Caplinger  0:51'43.08
Male 45-49 Walk
Place Bib Name Time
153 386 Todd Plotner  0:49'52.45
Female 45-49 Walk
Place Bib Name Time
106 372 Erica Baker  0:41'29.02
181 316 Melissa Barth  0:57'36.70
184 307 Tina Brucker  0:57'41.80
Male 50-54 Runner
Place Bib Name Time
4 119 Robert Boston  0:21'12.52
22 147 Brian Seeley  0:25'45.92
29 182 Kenneth Angle  0:26'53.86
Female 50-54 Runner
Place Bib Name Time
23 112 Anna Vanderlaan  0:25'56.49
47 170 Becky Poling  0:32'13.52
108 230 Kris Casto  0:42'30.55
Male 50-54 Walker
Place Bib Name Time
148 377 Scott Simonton  0:49'12.24
191 334 Jeff Wasson  0:58'41.92
Female 50-54 Walker
Place Bib Name Time
131 329 Jennifer Yerex  0:46'43.33
146 338 Lisa Null  0:48'57.67
162 326 Patty Metz  0:52'03.05
Male 55-59 Runner
Place Bib Name Time
33 192 Robert Sheridan  0:28'25.61
99 186 Larry Atkinson  0:40'33.89
Female 55-59 Runner
Place Bib Name Time
54 144 Diana Cline  0:33'23.70
64 142 Pamela Addis  0:35'19.05
88 208 Mary Beth Bauman  0:38'32.08
Male 55-59 Walker
Place Bib Name Time
101 301 Bob Heddleston  0:40'56.92
139 346 Mike Chevalier  0:47'30.83
203 366 Scott Mahoney  1:05'29.70
Female 55-59 Walker
Place Bib Name Time
93 378 Kim Windland  0:39'12.21
132 328 Renee Ellenwood  0:46'47.05
137 302 Kim Bradley  0:47'29.55
Male 60-64 Runner
Place Bib Name Time
42 143 Donald Lane  0:30'52.95
Female 60-64 Runner
Place Bib Name Time
114 363 Cherrie Cowan  0:44'34.92
Male 60-64 Walker
Place Bib Name Time
91 376 George Welch  0:38'57.36
129 382 Jim Arnold  0:46'35.45
Female 60-64 Walker
Place Bib Name Time
92 381 Linda Arnold  0:39'04.55
115 313 Deb Patrick  0:44'45.89
117 342 Kim Holdren  0:44'56.99
Male 65-69 Runner
Place Bib Name Time
17 162 Patrick Cathey  0:24'20.02
86 213 Jack Lane  0:38'00.42
126 154 Bill Toomey  0:46'08.21
Male 65-69 Walker
Place Bib Name Time
193 345 Milt Morris  0:58'44.36
Female 65-69 Walker
Place Bib Name Time
103 303 Joan Smith  0:41'13.17
105 362 Martha Marks  0:41'23.80
Male 70 & Over Runner
Place Bib Name Time
76 160 Charlie Pickens  0:37'04.74
155 177 Tommy Nichols  0:50'45.30
Female 70 & Over Runner
Place Bib Name Time
97 110 Peggy Grimm  0:40'10.05
Male 70 & Over Walker # in Group
Place Bib Name Time
89 370 William Cunningham  0:38'34.42
112 383 Ernie Doll  0:43'25.70
Female 70 & Over Walker
Place Bib Name Time
96 361 Barbara Jahn  0:40'03.52
152 319 Connie Porter  0:49'43.70
190 336 Sandy McCroskey  0:58'40.74

Choosing the best birth location for your birth is an individual choice.  Having a friend or family member that liked a birth location won't tell you what that birth location can do for you.  The best way to choose the best birth location for your birth is to take a tour of the location and know the routines and policies that birth location utilizes for birth.  Considering home birth, birth center birth, and hospital birth can all help to provide you with the most well rounded approach to making an informed decision for your birth.  In most cases, your care provider determines the birth location, so choosing the birth location and care provider are choices that go hand in hand.

Trusting your birth location for the options available to you that allow you to feel comfortable laboring in this space for the pregnancy that you are experiencing now will allow your oxytocin levels to be at their highest for labor progression rather than labor suppressing adrenaline.

Why are You Selecting This Birth Location?

Are you selecting a location other than your home?  Do you know why you are selecting home or not your home? Your birth location not only comes with your care provider, but also the team of people working with your care provider.  In most hospital births, your care provider won't even be present until shortly before the actual birth, so you need to be well aware of the staff that you will be interacting with as if they were the chosen care provider.  Routines and policies can influence not only what you may have to request differently than the routines, but the respect you receive during labor, birth, and the days following.

Use the table below as a guide to help you find the best birth location and birth environment for your #happyhealthybirth.

Thoughts and questions to ask yourself and to research about your chosen birth environment Biological Birth Supportive May want to seek other location
I am excited to walk into my chosen birth location and it feels like a place I can kick up my feet and relax if I want to without feeling like I'm burdening anyone YES NO
I enjoy the presence of the staff or assistants available in this birth locations YES NO
I do not have time limits for birth expected of me in this birth location YES NO
Medications are not a first recommendation for labor progression YES NO
Cytotec is NOT a method used for induction at this birth location YES NO
Pitocin is NOT a routine approach to the birth of the placenta or following the birth of the placenta YES NO
Eating and drinking is encouraged, as the mother desires, during labor YES NO
Movement is encouraged through labor YES NO
Quiet, calm, and dark environments are encouraged through labor and birth [the pushing stage], as well as the first few hours after birth YES NO
Using the placenta for postpartum hemorrhage is an option YES NO
The cord is routinely kept intact until the placenta is birthed and the cord becomes white and stops pulsing YES NO
Lotus birth is an option YES NO
Staff do not become aggressive or sarcastic when handling home birth transfers YES NO
Women choose their own labor and birth position YES NO
Doulas are encouraged to be present and respected YES NO
Siblings can be present during labor and birth YES NO
Water (tub or shower) is encouraged and available as a method of relaxation through labor and birth YES NO
Physical and emotional support is a first approach to helping a mom be confident and comfortable through labor, not medications YES NO
Staff encourage me to talk with my birth team about the benefits, risks, alternatives, intuition, and choosing not to use a recommendation or option YES NO
Babies are encouraged to be skin to skin with mom, or dad if mom is unavailable YES NO
Mandatory nor encouraged nursery time is NOT a part of routine care YES NO
Experienced lactation providers are available at all hours and days and a part of routine care for new mothers YES NO
Birth partners are encouraged to participate and are supported through labor, birth, and postpartum YES NO
I don't feel like I need a birth guide [birth plan] to get the birth that I desire at this location because the routines and policies align with my views of birth and care throughout labor, birth, and postpartum for me and my baby YES NO

Of course, the ideal is a YES to all of these, right?  At least much more than the majority. Are these the only priorities?  No, of course not... and there are many other factors that will play into the quality and care of a birth location.  Each mother may have different needs that help her determine the specific options she may want to utilize during birth, but facilities and the staff that support in those facilities create an environment of belief of the body's ability, or belief that birth is always a risk waiting to happen.  From unassisted birth to any level of risk, providers can be supportive of birthing families through respectful care.

There are a lot of discussions about the ways to involve siblings at birth: Should we?  Is it harmful?  Will they bother mom too much?  Will they be scarred for life?  Most of these questions stem from a culture that puts a veil over a lot of normal life functions and discussions and instead plays pretend, leaves little Tommy with a sitter, or simply lies to avoid uncomfortable conversations.  Don't get me wrong, there are simply some events where parents just need the space to be in their own mind without distractions and only the parent can truly decide what is best for the family as a whole.

Children often handle birth and breastfeeding delightfully and it opens up so many wonderful opportunities for real life discussion and understanding.  They may sleep through the entire event.  They may play and step in now and then, ask some questions or observe and want to know someone will make them dinner.  They may get bored and need some guided activities or outside time.  They may want to snuggle mom or get in the birth tub.  Your labor and birth location will determine a lot of how normal the birth process feels to siblings and how involved they are able to feel.

How, then, can we involve siblings at birth if we decide this is what is right for our family?  Here are four fun ways to make them feel like a part of the experience without playing pretend.

Birth Team Host to involve siblings at birth

Having older siblings make coffee, snacks, and meals for a home birth team as well as care for younger siblings is one of the most common ways to involve siblings at birth.  This is a good task for the tween group.  They're old enough to really want an important job, to do some kitchen tasks by themselves, and to understand that mom may need her space and time with her birth team.  Teens can be sent on errands, to the grocery store even, depending on the needs during the birth.  All the siblings can prep sandwiches, put on a crockpot full of soup, and be sure the pot of coffee is at the ready.  They can answer the door as people arrive so whoever is supporting mom can stay with her without interruption, including in birth center and hospital settings.

Birth Attendant Role to involve siblings at birth

Another important task for the older groups is being an intuitive birth attendant.  These tasks can start during pregnancy, allowing older siblings to be involved in prental appointments as well as birth classes and get a great understanding of the birth processes before birth.  During labor they can be sure mom has water available, with fresh cucumber and a bendy straw, wherever she goes.  Siblings can be sure the bed is prepped with a shower curtain and fresh linens.  They can fetch cool towels, a birth ball, and rub mom's back.  Depending on their abilities can depend how much they are able to physically help with mom's comfort if she desires support, but many of these tasks are excellent for even young children freeing up the other birth attendants and Dad for continues support in other ways.

Make Birth Announcements to involve siblings at birth

Siblings making birth announcements can be as simple as changing the greeting on your voicemail and answering phone calls to making “Do Not Disturb; Baby Sleeping” signs and adding Baby’s name, weight, and birth info. for those that may be dropping by food, or the mail.  Hand-written cards can be sent with a new photo to all the baby shower and blessingway attendees, giving siblings plenty to keep occupied during the first weeks after the birth and plenty of time for mom to get settled in with breastfeeding.

Birth Photography is a great way to involve siblings at birth

This can be from the oldest sibling to a toddler and one of my favorite ways to involve siblings at birth.  The only real challenge is finding the camera you're comfortable with them using and making sure a flash or noise isn't too distracting if they’re not up to speed on camera settings.  Thankfully, disposable cameras still exist (even in digital form) if you don't own a camera and don't want to hand off the cell.

Even more fun with disposable cameras, a young child can have a lot of fun decorating the camera to fit their personal tastes and getting prints in the mail after the birth is an extra present.  Add in a personal scrap book, stickers, markers, and fun paper for a great quiet-time activity while you're resting and nursing.  Save some photos to be taken during the first year to add to the scrapbook and now the siblings not only have a great way to be involved at the birth, but also a great first birthday present to give as a keepsake.  Multiple siblings can easily share this activity and it's sure to be one of the highlights making the siblings feel very excited for their baby brother's or sister's birthday party.

 

Never underestimate the mind of a youth – they are ready and willing to learn all they can about life and their body and being a big help with chores and daily life before and after birth.  There are no necessary roles siblings need to take before, during or after the birth – but the more they are involved with the process, the more they will understand about their own body and the importance of the entire family helping for this new little life.  Making snacks, filling up water cups, and prepping nursing baskets with fun tasks (for mom and the little ones) as well as charging phones and starting a load of laundry are all helpful postpartum.

How do you love to involve siblings at birth?

 

home birth reasons Esali Birth

Home Birth on Your Research List?

While I don't encourage clients to "plan" for a specific style of birth, deciding a comfortable birth location is a part of the prenatal research process.  The fact is, we can't plan birth - we can't dictate exactly what will happen including the place we will actually birth - but we can prepare for birth with the understanding of the options at every birth location, including birthing at home (even if preparing for birth in a hospital).  When determining a laboring and birthing location that might match your birth philosophy, understanding how a birth environment influences your biology is crucial.  For many mothers, becoming comfortable with home birth is often a matter of understanding the options available to them and the safety of birth in general and home birth safety for your specific situation.  Many times, choosing to birth at home is a matter of really discovering your birth philosophy and being honest with how your current choices reflect those beliefs.

Home Birth Might be Right for You if...

  1. You are uncomfortable in a medical environment.
  2. You like to be the decision maker instead of being told what to do and want your birth team to trust your inner wisdom.
  3. You don't want an assembly line birth.
  4. You feel a provider formally signing a birth plan for you to experience a birth that matches your birth philosophy isn't the only way to achieve a happy healthy birth.
  5. You don't want medications offered as the first options for comfort.
  6. Your birth guide exceeds 1 page and want to find a birth location that better supports the biology of birth.
  7. You really can't get comfortable pooping anywhere else but home.
  8. You want to use colostrum instead of antibiotics as an eye ointment (or nothing at all).
  9. You don't want to have to decide when is the best time to leave for the birth location.
  10. You are considering "walking in pushing" or lying about your water breaking to avoid interventions in your current birth location choice.
  11. You don't want your care provider showing up just to catch the baby [as their routine].
  12. You don't want to rely on staff to relay details about your labor to your care provider over the phone as a routine.
  13. You want full comfort to build natural oxytocin with kisses, touch, privacy and intimacy as a normal part of the labor and birth process.
  14. You don't want to cut the cord until the placenta has been birthed or desire a lotus birth.
  15. You prefer your other children to be welcomed into your labor and birth space.
  16. You don't want limits on drinking or eating throughout labor.
  17. You don't want biologically unrealistic time limits for birth.
  18. You want the same people that provide you with prenatal and postpartum care to be the same people providing you with labor and postpartum care.
  19. You would prefer that you and your partner (and baby) sleep in your own comfortable bed together after the birth.
  20. You would prefer to reduce your chances of iatrogenic complications and approximately 30,000 preventable complications U.S. mothers experience.
  21. You don't feel the need to conform to your family's, friend's, or culture's perspective of maternity care.
  22. You prefer to receive attentive and regular postpartum care by phone and multiple home visits throughout your postpartum period.
  23. You are "low risk" and prefer a holistic approach to your situation from a provider comfortable with your situation and birth preferences.
  24. You are "high risk" and prefer a holistic approach to your situation from a provider comfortable with your situation and birth preferences.
  25. You believe birth is a part of the normal physiology of the body and not a medical event.

Does Home Birth Seem Like a Good Option for You?

While everyone that decides to prepare for birthing in their home has different reasons, the most important reason to prepare to birth at home is for your own personal reasons.  No one else can make that decision for you.  While there are pros and cons to all birth locations, just because a location is right for someone else (even in the same situation as yourself) doesn't mean it is right for you.  Discover your birth philosophy by learning about the birth industry in your location, through birth classes and perinatal mentoring, and learning how you can increase your birth options through health and wellness.  Then, make an informed decision being prepared for birth in any location and choosing the birth team and birth environment that's best for YOU.

Vaginal Birth by Location Rates Esali Birth

Vaginal Birth Location

Vaginal birth location is influenced by many factors.  U.S. Women can expect an approximate 94% chance of vaginal birth when planning to birth at home.  Only approximately 68% of women planning hospital birth will have a vaginal birth in the hospital.

Amnesty International reported in 2011 that cesarean births were at an all time high in the U.S. of 32.9%.

The CDC told us in 2015, 32% of women birthed by cesarean a decrease from prior years.

Improving Birth tells us 33% of women across the U.S. have a cesarean birth (27% of those are first time mothers).

CesareanRates.com documents 32.2% of women birthing by cesarean in 2014.

What influences vaginal birth rates?

At home, 11% of mothers can expect to transfer to a hospital, leaving 89% experiencing vaginal birth at home.  However, of the 11% that transfer to a hospital, 53% will still greet their baby by vaginal birth, the remaining percentage transferring for third stage, postpartum, or newborn care.  Altogether, this equals to approximately 94% of women planning to birth at home will birth vaginally, even if hospital transfer becomes necessary or desired, as the Midwives Alliance of North America (MANA) explains in their report of the 2014 home birth transfer systemic review.

The approximate 32-33% overall cesarean rate includes mothers that planned a home birth; however, less than 1% of women in the U.S. plan to birth at home, making little difference in the overall cesarean rate.

In many hospitals women are:

  • Required to birth within 12 hours of being admitted or from the time their amniotic sac ruptures or receive a cesarean
  • Not permitted to eat or drink throughout labor
  • Restricted on mobility during labor
  • Unable to choose their birth position
  • Expected to dilate at textbook rates
  • Monitored by a team that relays information to the provider to receive instructions on care
  • Not given a quiet, calm, or dark environment necessary for oxytocin production and labor progression
  • Directed through pushing strength and time
  • Not adequately supported through the basics of breastfeeding

At most home births, women are:

  • Provided with patience to labor as their body needs
  • Intermittently monitored to not disturb the laboring mother
  • Encouraged to push when they feel the urge to do so
  • Encouraged to eat and drink throughout labor
  • Personally monitored by the care provider for early signs of distress

Birth Location Considerations

  • Planned vaginal birth at home birth is considered as safe as, often with less intervention than, hospital birth for healthy women and babies
  • Increased risks in home birth are created when families that are expecting to birth in the hospital are not prepared by their care provider or educated on unassisted birth
  • Cesareans can be life saving for both mom and baby when utilized when necessary
  • Planned cesareans, in some situations, may decrease postpartum depression for some mothers unable to heal from traumatic birth experiences
  • Cesareans, in some situations, may influence neurological disorders in the child due to reduced oxytocin from induced, augmented, or excessively long difficult labors

How can I increase safety and prepare for birth in all locations?

  • Families educated on the birth industry and influence of care providers and birth locations are the ones choosing home birth.  Get educated.
  • Increase Dad's confidence with information specific to the birth partner's role in all birth settings.
  • Take an independent complete perinatal education series to learn about your rights in birth, options for birth, health and wellness, labor physiology, breastfeeding, postpartum care, and parenting basics
  • Schedule perinatal mentoring sessions for one-on-one guidance through the childbearing years, guidance for your specific situation, and confidence building for the whole birth team
  • Prepare for unassisted birth so that you are ready for all situations, even if you are not planning to birth alone.  Then, every choice you add on top of that will [should] only enhance the birth experience.  Panicking during an unplanned birth scenario is an important aspect of the increased risk during unplanned home births and unplanned unassisted births, even when families are preparing to birth at home.
  • Take responsibility in your perinatal choices by selecting a care provider and birth location that supports the biology of birth and breastfeeding, builds confidence and trust, and respects your rights and desires for you and your baby's health
  • Prepare your body and mind for a more holistic approach to birth with the FREE Esali Birth Prep 10-Week challenge, increasing physical and emotional health and increasing options available to you no matter where you birth

Most new childbearing families feel a sense of comfort birthing in the US from a perceived belief that our developed status makes us less prone to less than ideal outcomes.  Reality, however, is not quite so...

What we know:

  • The U.S. has the worst maternal health statistics of ALL developed countries (we rank 61st). Yes, even though we spend more per capita on health care and many [hospital] births are off the charts expensive.  Home births can be expensive, but relatively they are much lower costs.  Many women find that the cost of a home birth is lower than insurance deductibles.
  • 99% of births are in a Hospital, attended by nursing staff focused on monitors and obstetrician that are not present for labor.  Shouldn't this increase our safety if women are birthing in a hospital believing they are receiving the best care?  However, it can be quite difficult to really tell what is happening in labor if someone is only focusing on monitors, "observing" a laboring mother from a completely separate room, or getting feedback from phone conversations.  This does not happen at a typical home birth, I can assure you.  Quietly knitting in the corner, possibly - but ever listening, observing, noting, and providing calm energy.
  • Countries with better health statistics have midwife-attended labors and births with home birth as an accessible option supported by obstetrician.
    Yes, European countries have a model of maternity care that encourages midwives for normal healthy births collaborating with obstetrician for higher risk births and surgical birth.  Only 8% of births are attended by midwives in the US, and many of them have also never seen a home birth but rather learned from Obstetric and medically managed births.
  • Studies show home birth is as safe as, with less interventions, than hospital birth.  We have to start with the idea that providers actually understand the biology of birth.  If they've never seen a normal non-intervened birth, then they can't adequately compare what is normal and what is managed.  At most home births, a quiet and calm midwife with experience in home birth will watch and let mom do her thing in peace and love with her family.  She may support emotionally, palpate, suggest positions, and listen to heart tones - but she starts with a perspective that birth takes time, mobility, and love.  If we go to medicine every time something isn't matching an outdated and limited-study chart, then we're seriously diminishing the birth safety for mothers from the get go.  Once that first intervention starts, it often snowballs into many others and sometimes, walking out the front door is that first intervention because moms no longer feel calm and confident.
  • Hemorrhage is the leading cause of maternal death. This is true just about anywhere, but what people don't realize is how much a medically intervened birth increases this risk.  Environments that don't support biology such as taking baby away from mom, medications surrounding birth, and anything that decreases oxytocin such as bright lights, noise, chaos, too many people in the birth room, and staff demeanor, will increase adrenaline which is an antagonistic hormone to oxytocin.  Oxytocin is the hormone that contracts the uterus.  A contracting uterus after the birth (which is also increased with baby being skin to skin and nuzzling the breast) clamps down on the capillaries and stops bleeding.  This is only ONE influence, which happens in practically all hospital births, that increases risks of hemorrhage.  The other significant issue is postpartum care which is virtually nil in hospital births.  With a home birth, midwives see the mom multiple times after the birth, call often, and meet with mom 2-3 times within a 6 week period for a normal birth.  Most moms birthing by cesarean only have one appointment after 6 weeks.  A lot can happen during postpartum such as hemorrhage and eclampsia.  Care needs to continue for moms with adequate breastfeeding knowledge and support and postpartum healing care.  This would also decrease postpartum depression, which brings us to our next point.
  • 10-20% of US women suffer from postpartum depression.  This doesn't cover prenatal depression... but why is this happening?  We've created a culture that believes baby blues are a normal part of postpartum, for one.  That many mothers are sad that it is literally believed to be expected.  This is ridiculous.  When a woman is designed to have a flood of happy hormones pour over her throughout birth, immediately after birth at higher levels than orgasm, and every single time she breastfeeds - what in the world would make postpartum such a depressing time?  Let's think about the fact that 42% of women are induced and another 47% are augmented (sped up) both often with synthetic oxytocin (pitocin or syntocinon) which doesn't cross the blood-brain barrier and as such doesn't have the same psychological effects as natural oxytocin.  Let's think about the 99% of women birthing in environments with bright lights, a lot of noise, and often chaos immediately after birth all of which decrease natural oxytocin.  Let's think about all those babies whisked away, screaming like crazy, handled like a rag doll, and jammed with all sorts of needles and suction devices and touching people that have no business touching the baby before mom.  Let's think about the majority of hospital birthing women that receive a routine injection of pitocin post birth to "prevent" postpartum hemorrhage (never mind the fact if the prior labor care was biological, natural oxytocin and immediate bonding/skin to skin would work as it should).  Let's think about all the supplements and pacifiers not only at home, but given away in the hospital to reduce breastfeeding.  Let's think about all the providers that know next to nothing, or completely wrong, breastfeeding information.  Let's think about all the moms that go home and are expected to do it all, even some going back to work in 3-6 weeks before they're ever physically healed, let alone psychologically.  Let's think about all those women that are expected to milk their breasts with a machine instead of having their baby with them as nature designed.  Let's think about the lack of support women have during these stages when other countries literally pamper the mom for 4-6 weeks with food, love, and most of all encouragement to lie with her baby and rest and nurse.  Let's think about what we're causing, not what to expect because we're unwilling to change practices.  Let's think about the 33% of women birthing by cesarean, likely 1/2 of those being preventable through proper care, that have doulas and dads holding their baby on their breast to nurse because they're so medicated and tired they can't hold their arms up.  Let's think about these cesarean birthers that are healing from birth trauma and major surgery that are told, "all that matters is a healthy baby" who are not just suppressed on telling their story, but never routinely counseled to process their birth.  Home birth midwives STILL meet with their hospital transfer patients during postpartum when their care was transfered because they get what a mother needs.  Where is this care for most of that 33% of women?
  • More women are birthing unassisted because of their fear of trauma from birth attendants and hospital policies. While I am among the few that support unassisted birth because I support autonomy and I believe in the body's ability - I am appalled that many women are choosing this not because they feel empowered to do so and are truly at peace with all birth scenarios, but because our maternity system is failing.  It is increasing their fear of harassment, bullying, birth rape, safety for mom and baby, and ultimately parental confidence.

 

Now, make no mistake - all of this is real and true, but in most communities, we are certainly blessed to have the ability to choose home birth with experienced attendants.  Likewise, the relative risks are overall low in childbirth - not at all like it was when birth first moved into the hospital and providers were increasing risks of birth by causing illnesses simply from not washing their hands.  We've come a long way and have a lot of methods available to us to make birth safer.  The key, however, is to use those methods when needed and not as a form of defensive medicine or our of fear for lack of biological understanding.  There are so many great resources to help you learn more about birth in the US such as www.improvingbirth.org, www.primalhealthresearch.com, and www.childbirthconnection.com.

Feeling confused?  Looking for options?  Seeking the desire to free your mind of birth fear?  Schedule a mentoring session with me and let's talk about your situation and your options.  Let's talk about your health to maximize your birth options and let's talk about how to navigate this birth industry for the happiest birth possible, because a happy birth is a healthy birth.

Birth Emotions Matter

There are so. many. reasons. why I am rarely ever impressed with a medical team – because they completely disregard one of the most important factors of the birth experience – the LONG LASTING emotional affects of birth. The emotional affects of the way a mother is treated on her milk supply, her postpartum experience, her parenting experience, and her empowerment.

We are now in a time where the majority of births are medicalized. They are often induced (synthetically started) and we have gone so far beyond where the medical system helps the natural system that we don’t believe the natural system even exists. It wasn’t until Ricki Lakes’ The Business of Being Born that released in 2008 that families started to realize that a natural and very different method of birth did exist, and this was often not in a hospital setting. Even though the home birth rates did increase since this new natural birth movement, they still only account for less than 1% of births in the US.

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